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Why All New WebRevelation Websites Are Responsive

Posted Wed, January 14, 2015 by Julie Short

For a long time, Internet marketing experts have been talking about the coming mobile web revolution. They’re not talking about it anymore, though, because it’s already here.

Industry observers expect mobile web users – those browsing through smartphones and tablets – to become the majority at some point in 2015. That means smart marketers have had to adapt their approach to account for lots of small screens, something we’ve been working on here at WebRevelation.

These days, we’re providing our new clients with current and responsive web designs. In the mobile-ready world, they offer the perfect mix of functionality and long-term value.

Why Responsive Design Is Critical

If you aren’t completely familiar with the concept already, a responsive website is one that shifts and changes with different browsers and window sizes. With just a little bit of behind-the-scenes coding, it can arrange things like text and images differently depending on what kind of configuration a visitor is using. Someone viewing your pages in full screen gets one version, while someone else working with a smaller space gets another.

This matters a great deal because industry experts now think more than half of all web traffic is composed of users who are accessing websites via mobile devices. And what’s more, they aren’t all iPhones and Kindles – there are iPads, Androids, and Samsung Galaxy devices, not to mention a dozen others.

Each of these can have a different size, resolution, and underlying platform… and as time marches on, there won’t just be more and more of these devices, but more types of them and different generations in use (i.e., original iPads versus second-generation and iPad Mini devices).

The Bottom-Line Benefits of a Responsive Website

What this all means to you, as a business owner or marketer, is that a website that isn’t responsive may not look the way it was meant to for all of your visitors, especially going forward. Every time text and images show up where they shouldn’t, or aren’t arranged in a way that puts your products and services in the best light, you are likely to miss out on a chance to win a new customer.

WebRevelation has chosen to build responsive websites for our clients to enable them to market more effectively and keep their businesses growing.

Responsive functionality makes great business sense in an online world that’s dominated by mobile devices. Why not speak to a member of the WebRevelation team today and see how easy it is to add mobile compatibility to a new or existing web presence?

Posted in : Websites , FYI , Announcements | 
Tags : responsive , websites

3 Reasons to Look More Closely at Web App Development

Posted Wed, January 7, 2015 by Julie Short

For the average business owner or marketer, “custom app development” seems like something for only Fortune 500 companies and high-volume e-commerce sites. Simply put, they tend to think of it as something they don’t need and couldn’t afford.

However, we frequently come across new clients who could profit or benefit from web app development and just don’t know it yet.

Could you be one of them? It’s possible. Here are three reasons to look a little more closely at web app development this year:

1. Web apps increase the power, functionality, and usefulness of your website. While there are more apps and plug-ins available to web designers and developers than ever before, sometimes you just can’t get something that does what you need – or the way you need it – from an existing product. When that happens, modifying an existing app, or having one developed from scratch, can be the perfect answer.

Custom web apps can help with things like databases, polls, inventory, marketing, transaction security and encryption, and so much more. Each of these increases the functionality and value of your website.

2. Having a custom web app developed can often help you earn or save money in other areas. Business owners are often turned off by what they imagine the costs of web app development to be. That’s easy to understand, but it can hide the potential for bigger opportunities.

As with any investment, web app development can be well worth the small hit to your budget if it helps your company reach more customers, get real-time updates from suppliers, streamline financial transactions, or improve your bottom line in any one of dozens of ways.

3. Web app development is more affordable than a lot of business people would imagine. Speaking of budgets, it’s worth pointing out that custom web app development doesn’t cost nearly as much as business owners and executives tend to imagine it might. Even having a new piece of software written from scratch doesn’t need to be a major expense, or something that holds up the development of your website.

Five or ten years ago, web app development and custom programming were expensive, technical, and time-consuming projects that really weren’t worth the trouble unless you had a huge website that needed dozens of complex or industry-specific features. Now, though, businesses of all sizes are getting in on the act… and they’re finding that it’s a lot easier and more effective than they ever imagined.

How can WebRevelation help you improve your business through Internet marketing and technology services? Call or email our team today to find out.

Posted in : Websites , Business Strategy | 
Tags : webapps , affordable , custom

Why a New Website Can Give You So Much More Than a New Online Look (and What the Difference Can Mean for Your Bottom Line)

Posted Wed, December 31, 2014 by Julie Short

For a lot of companies, the time for a new business website comes around at the exact moment that management decides the old site "looks old." While that's not a bad way to judge the aesthetics of your web presence, it's not a great measuring stick for trying to decide whether a new site can help your company be more profitable and efficient, either.

That's because a new business website can give you so much more than a fresh online look… and the difference in functionality can actually make a huge bottom-line difference in your company's future.

To give you a sense of why this is, and why the real value of the new site is in programming and business power, here are a few things a modern web presence can help you with:

Improve your marketing (even if it's business-to-business). Although Internet marketing is something nearly every business owner or executive already knows a bit about, most don't realize how effective it can be in building business-to-business relationships. At the very least, your site should add to your company's credibility and support your other offline sales and marketing efforts.

Make inventory control and logistics more accurate and efficient. With customized databases, real-time information entry, and even the integration of mobile devices, you can keep better track of what's going on at your production facilities and warehouses through your business website.

Help with routine customer service and account management tasks. Why make customers call you on the phone when they could place recurring orders or update their account information online, or through a mobile app? That reduces the burden of time and expense for you and your clients or customers. 

Move potential buyers along with lead automation. Do you or your sales teams spend a lot of time following up with individual leads? An automated response system can distribute marketing literature, steer them towards answers to common questions, and even perform lead nurturing tasks on your behalf, so your time is freed up to finalize concrete sales opportunities.

Help you manage employees, vendors, and projects. There are a variety of tools you can use and install to make your business website support collaborative, real-time project management, even if you have employees or vendors in other locations around the world.

If your business website isn't doing all for your company that it could be, we encourage you to get in touch with the WebRevelation team today and let us show you how we've been able to help other businesses accomplish more online.

Posted in : Websites | 
Tags : web applications , websites

SEO 101: Semantic Search and the Evolution of SEO

Posted Wed, December 24, 2014 by Julie Short

The deeper you get into search engine optimization, the harder it is to speak about specifics. This is partly because Google keeps its exact formulas and algorithms secret – we know that things like keywords and links are important to search engine rankings, for example, but don’t know exactly how they factor into the rankings at a mathematical level.

Another important reason, however, is that search engine optimization is always evolving. Google is always tweaking its approach to stay one step ahead of its competitors, and that means there are always going to be new wrinkles or ideas to consider.

Here at WebRevelation, we work hard to stay on top of these trends and best practices so our clients will always be prepared. The more competitive a search market is, the more fine-tuning and refinement is needed on a continual basis. If you want to bury your competitors and get the most traffic, you can’t let your website and search engine optimization plan become stagnant.

To give you an idea of why continual SEO refinement is so important, here are just a few of the most important search trends we’ve noticed in the past year or two:

Semantic search. Contextual search is getting to be an even bigger and more important part of Google’s algorithm. In a few years, individual keywords may not matter much at all; instead, search results will be based on a user’s preference and a host of other factors like location, visit history, and the overall depth and topic of a website. In other words, Google is getting better at figuring out what people really want when they search, and recognizing that the keywords they use might not be the clearest form of the question.

Local SEO. Now that Internet searches have effectively replaced the Yellow Pages and local print advertising in a lot of areas, local search engine optimization – based on geographic search terms – is more important than ever. If you don’t have text on your website that identifies your city, state, or area, you could be missing out on a lot of traffic.

Social inputs. More and more, Google and the other search engines are using social popularity and activity as a means for determining credibility. So having lots of followers, and comments on your social profiles, could conceivably help you achieve a higher search engine ranking. That’s especially true in the case of Google+, which is owned by the search giant itself.

Harsher penalties for bad SEO. Once upon a time, you could rank very well for lots of search terms by simply listing keywords over and over, “borrowing” content from your competitors, or having lots of low-quality links point at your website. Those days are over, however, and engaging in these kinds of tricks will likely get you penalized by Google and the other search engines to the point where they may not list your website in the search results at all.

Staying on top of search engine optimization takes a lot of work, but it also brings big rewards. If you can win visitors your competitors don’t have access to, you’ll enjoy a steady flow of buyers coming to your website each and every day.

How can we help you with your search engine optimization and Internet marketing campaigns? Call WebRevelation today to let us know, and we’ll be happy to schedule a free consultation for you and your team.

Posted in : Website Content , SEO/SMO/SMM | 
Tags : semantic , search , google , SEO

SEO 101: Context and Authority

Posted Wed, December 17, 2014

We’ve already covered a lot of ground in our SEO 101 series, explaining how Google uses small bits of automated software to scan and analyze websites, as well as what you can do to make your own pages easier to find and understand.

When it comes to the reasons search engines have to prefer one website over another, however, not everything comes down to the text that’s on your page. That’s still the biggest factor, but it’s not the only one. After all, Google has to have a way of separating two websites with similar content and keywords. Just think of all the different pizza places or accountants, for example, that could have websites in a given area. How do search engines decide which ones are given a priority?

Beyond the content on the websites themselves, it often comes down to context and authority. Let’s take a quick look at each one.

Context in Search Engine Results

Psychologists will tell you that context and nonverbal communication are actually key to the way humans interact with and understand one another. Google can’t read your facial expressions or tone of voice (yet), but it can use context to try to figure out what you’re actually looking for, even if the piece of information you want doesn’t exactly match your search string.

For example, if you type in a question about a baseball player, it may steer you to a site with a matching keyword and a lot of other baseball-related facts and articles. Additionally, it may consider other websites you’ve recently searched, or topics you’ve been looking for more information on, along with your geographic location, preferred language, and other demographic data to try to sort out a set of results that are most meaningful to you.

This is incredibly helpful as a searcher, but it has important implications for marketers, too. The more useful your website is as a whole – meaning the more pieces of interesting and unique content it has – the more potential it has to answer questions. So in that sense, context is all about identifying your location and having lots of great content.

How Authority Factors Into SEO

If context is all about delivering the best match, authority is about finding the most trustworthy answers. To help searchers get the right answers to their questions, and not just the best keyword matches, Google has to consider the authority of your website.

Authority is built and demonstrated in a few ways: by having other respected websites link to yours, with lots of social activity, and by having an abundance of recent, unique, and in-depth articles (usually in the form of a blog).

With all of these factors in place, Google can feel confident that you know what you’re talking about and are a relevant source of information on your topic or industry. Then, it can begin to favor your website over the competition.

Context and authority aren’t quite as straightforward as things like keyword placement are, but they are important to understand and take advantage of if you want to rank highly in a market with lots of different competitors. In the final installment of our SEO 101 series, we’ll take things further and look at some of the newer trends in search engine optimization.

Check back next week for the conclusion of our SEO 101 series. Or, for customized advice on web design and Internet marketing, call or email the WebRevelation team today to arrange for a free consultation.

Posted in : Website Content , SEO/SMO/SMM | 
Tags : SEO , context , authority , google

SEO 101: Making Your Pages More Visible to Search Engines

Posted Wed, December 10, 2014 by Julie Short

In the first part of our SEO 101 series, we looked at the way Google uses automated “spiders” to go through your site and decide what your content is actually about. That’s actually a fairly simple process, but it doesn’t tell the whole story.

After all, there could be hundreds, thousands, or even millions of webpages out there relating to your topic or industry. Search for “San Antonio web design” and you’ll see exactly what we mean. We know how tough the competition is out there because we deal with it every day.

It’s one thing to have Google be aware of your website, and another thing for the world’s largest search engine to be sending you visitors every day. So making your pages more visible, in a search engine optimization sense, is an incredibly important topic.

Here are a few things you can do to make your pages stand out, and the reasons why:

Pay attention to page titles and meta descriptions. The title of your page is important because it tells Google what a specific piece of content should be about. You want yours to be short, but also to contain important search keywords.

Meta descriptions, on the other hand, don’t have any search engine optimization value but are displayed in search listings. That means they can be helpful in getting visitors to click through to your website.

Add more in-depth, keyword-rich content. All other things being equal, Google likes longer pages with important keywords used more than once. It’s not hard to understand why – a more comprehensive search result, and one that’s narrowly devoted to a certain topic, is more likely to give a searcher the answer he or she is looking for than a small blurb of generic text.

Be careful, though, that you don’t go overboard with either of these concepts. Having too many keywords, or too much content, can be worse than having none at all. If Google feels like you’re building pages for the sole purpose of SEO, it will ignore them (and the rest of your website) altogether.

Create lots of pages on similar topics. In the same way that a longer page with lots of information is usually more valuable than a shorter one, Google knows that a comprehensive website with many related posts or articles is probably more helpful to a searcher than one with just a few offerings. That’s why building lots of pages that relate to each other is important for SEO.

Keep your content fresh and up to date. We live in an age where millions and millions of pages are being added to the Internet every day. That means Google can afford to be picky and look for more current search results for its users. The more often you update your pages, the more relevant your website will seem and the more search engine traffic you’ll be rewarded with.

There are other, more advanced techniques you can use to make your pages stand out to search engines, but just paying attention to the basics is often enough to separate you from your competitors – or at least make a good start at a more comprehensive search engine optimization campaign.

In the next post, we’re going to go a bit deeper into the concept of linking, relevancy, and currency as we look at the broader SEO meaning of context and authority.

Be sure to stop back and check out that post, or contact a member of the WebRevelation team to get a free consultation today.

Posted in : Website Content , SEO/SMO/SMM | 
Tags : SEO , google , keywords , content

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