817-283-3324
LinkedIn Twitter Facebook
WebRev Connect
web solutions that work


Blog - Email

 

Should you be doing Email marketing in 2014?

Posted Thu, February 13, 2014 by Julie Short


With the rise of social media and mobile marketing, email marketing can often times be forgotten. Does that mean this strategy is dying? No way. In fact, if you haven’t been doing email marketing before 2014, you have definitely lost out on some prime business opportunities.

Don’t you worry, 2014 is here and you still have time to hop on the nostalgia-ridden bandwagon that is email marketing.


Still feeling skeptical? Here’s some information that should help ease you into the idea that email marketing still exists: According to last year’s Econsultancy/Adestra Email Marketing Census, 55% of all company respondents attributed more than 10% of their total sales to email marketing, while 18% of respondents attributed over 30% of their total sales to email marketing! Those stats show the value and importance that still exists in email marketing.


The problem that most people run into when it comes to email marketing is figuring out the ins and outs that really make this strategy successful, such as: Choosing the best subject line, picking what types of offers to send and learning when the best time of day to send emails is. Did you know that the most active period for email opening is between 2pm and 5pm? Were you aware that Tuesday and Thursday are the busiest days in terms of email volume? These are facts that Mail Chimp discovered after analyzing more than a billion emails to identify trends to benefit email marketing. So, like any other marketing strategy, you really need to know your audience before you can achieve optimal success.

Here are a couple of things to remember not to do:  

  • Do not send important emails between the hours of 10pm and 8am. This should be self-explanatory, but just to clarify: People are less likely to open emails when it’s time to wind down and go to sleep. Most people begin their work day at either 8am or 9am, so the likelihood of somebody opening an important email before 8am decreases significantly.
     
  • Do not send important emails on the weekend if you’re looking for an immediate response. Around 85% of all emails are sent and opened between Monday and Friday. The weekends are supposed to be stress free and relaxing! Even though checking email is becoming more and more of a mobile activity, the weekdays are still the best time to reach your audience.
     
  • Do not seem needy in your subject line. Mail Chimp analyzed the open rates for over 200 million emails and found that there were three phrases to absolutely avoid: Help, percent off, and reminder. These phrases have negative connotations that are associated with begging or offering something that might be too good to be true.


These are just a few standard rules to help you better understand what makes email marketing successful. At WebRevelation, we stay current on all studies and trends that are beneficial to our clients. Email marketing isn’t dead yet. Let us show you what you’ve been missing!

 

Posted in : Email Marketing | 
Tags : email marketing


Email Marketing: Getting More Email Signups from Your Website

Posted Thu, April 11, 2013 by Julie Short

An email database is an important marketing tool. A large database allows you to proactively communicate with a large number of your customers, but before you launch an email marketing campaign you’ve got to build the list. Your website is the easiest way to gather email addresses from interested parties. Be sure to convince people to want to subscribe to your emails. You have a better chance to retain them in the long run if they find value in your emails and chose to sign up.

Incentives
Once, I signed up for a company's newsletter for $1 off my bill every month. A lot of customers will connect with you for a small value. This value doesn’t have to be monetary, but most customers need an incentive to receive another brand email in their inbox. They are probably already receiving a lot of similar emails. Think long term. Signing up is half the battle. You want them to actually open your emails. Get creative and find an angle. Exchange with them something you have of value for their email address. This value could be exclusive, behind-the-scenes access or even exclusive coupons.

Regular Newsletter
Your goal isn’t only to build a giant email list. You only derive value from it if the people in your list care about what you send them. If they delete every email you send, your effort was a waste of time. A regular newsletter’s purpose is to maintain and boost long-term relationships with your subscribers. After a list is built, this is an opportunity to communicate, compel them to buy and continue to offer the value they initially signed up for.

Online Archive
Some subscribers want a preview of what they’re getting into before they commit. Maintain an online archive of past newsletters and email correspondence to let interested visitors see what they should expect in the future. If your newsletter or emails typically offer value, an online archive can help you grow your subscription list.

Multiple Signup Locations
Different people decide to commit at different points in the perusing process. You can’t know when a certain visitor will want to sign up. Place the form obviously on the web page. Make it easy for them to find a way to sign up without having to search for one specific page. Try integrating your value proposition into a “Hello Bar” and drive attention immediately to signing up. A “Hello Bar” is a small bar that stays fixed at the top of a page while you’re on a website.  

Give Them a Reason to Trust You
Most people are jaded by the bad practices of other brands, businesses and spammers. Provide your subscribers every assurance you aren’t one of those brands. Under your signup form or on a signup page, let them know how often you email out and what they should expect. Brands that email every day, especially frivolously, annoy the typical consumer. Provide a link to your privacy policy. This will tell people how you intend to use the information you’re collecting. Show subscribers you have nothing to hide, you will protect their private information and that you won’t share it with any third party.

Posted in : Email Marketing | 
Tags : email marketing , content


IMAP vs. POP

Posted Fri, September 24, 2010 by Tim J Short

We have recently had a plethora of questions regarding IMAP and POP and while WebRevelation does not support local email clients, we would like to try and answer your questions on IMAP.

What's the difference?
The main difference, as far as we are concerned here, is the way in which IMAP or POP controls your e-mail inbox.

In a nutshell: IMAP email access coordinates between the server and you mail application. Messages that have been read/deleted/replied-to will show as read/deleted/replied-to both on the server and in the mail application. POP3 does not coordinate with the server. Messages marked as read/deleted/replied-to in the mail application will not show as read/deleted/replied-to on the server. This means that future downloads of your inbox or other mailboxes with POP3 will show all messages as unread.

When you use IMAP you are accessing your inbox on the mail server. IMAP does not actually move messages onto your computer. You can think of an e-mail program using IMAP as a window to your messages on the server. Although the messages appear on your computer while you work with them, they remain on the mail server.

POP does the opposite. Instead of just showing you what is in your inbox on the mail server, it checks the server for new messages, downloads all the new messages in your inbox onto your computer, and then deletes them from the server. This means that every time you use POP to view your new messages, they are no longer on the mail server.

IMAP makes it easier to view mail from home, work, and other locations
Because IMAP leaves all of your messages on the mail server, you can view these messages from any location with Internet access. This means the e-mail inbox you view from home will be the same one you see at work.

Since POP downloads new messages to your computer and removes them from the server, you will not be able to see those new messages on another computer when you check your inbox. Those messages exist only on the computer that downloaded them using POP.

However, if you use IMAP and create e-mail folders on the server, these folders are accessible from anywhere you read your e-mail using IMAP. If you use POP and create e-mail folders, they are stored locally, and you cannot access these folders from anywhere except the computer on which you created them.

POP can create problems if you alternate between it and IMAP. There is an option in many POP e-mail programs to leave copies of the messages on the server, but this option has complications. When you leave copies of the messages on the server, then access your e-mail using WebMail or another IMAP e-mail client, the POP client may create duplicate messages next time it accesses the inbox; you will see each of the messages more than once, and you will have to clean out (delete) the unwanted ones.

You may want to keep local copies
While using IMAP to save e-mail on the mail server is recommended, there are reasons to have local copies of messages (messages downloaded to the computer, as with POP). Fortunately, IMAP allows you to keep local copies of all your messages. The option of local copies is useful when you are connecting from a dial-up connection. You may want to download your messages, then disconnect from the Internet and work with your mail offline. Please note that while you are working offline, you cannot send or receive mail. You need to be connected to the Internet to do those tasks.

You have a backup of your e-mail with IMAP
WebRevelation’s e-mail servers are backed up every night. Thus, when your e-mail is stored on the e-mail server (as is the case with IMAP), a backup of your e-mail is made every night. These backups are used in the event of system failures or if a virus deletes your local mail. If you use POP, you lose your mail.

Bonus “Jeopardy player” information:

What do they stand for?

  • IMAP = Internet Message Access Protocol
  • POP = Post Office Protocol
     
Posted in : Tips and Tricks | 
Tags : email , pop , imap


Blog Categories
RSS All Posts
RSS Announcements
RSS Blogging
RSS Business Strategy
RSS CRM
RSS e-commerce
RSS Email Marketing
RSS ERP
RSS Mobile Apps
RSS Mobile Websites
RSS Online Profile Management
RSS SEO/SMO/SMM
RSS Tips and Tricks
RSS Website Content
RSS Websites

GoogleRSS
YahooRSS
MSNRSS
Tags
home builder websites website navigation bounce rate slow load time gas and oil technology branding websites seo web design erp manufacturer professional website web conversion pinterest whoopi goldberg extreme couponers board pin follow did not start reality glasses voice recognition gesture technology google+ mobile website effective campaigns business strategy content is king web applications crm web solutions blogging tips blogging for home builders 10 demands entrepreneurs 5 reasons people fail 3 surefire ways to grow plan infobeasity get motivated hr email marketing linkedin entrepreneur motivation social media customer appreciation gifts whole foods real simple general electric search engine marketing marketing sem e commerce website advertising content mobile email pop imap the mobile playbook google mobile content mobile usage mobile expectations customer service store front reputation e-commerce webpayments blogging basics mobile websites lead generation mobile app
Quicksearch
Email Signup  


Testimonials
It was a turnkey project from the beginning to the finish, including the excelle...
I highly recommend WebRevelation and managing partner Julie Short. Julie has alw...
Contact Us

Web Design in Oklahoma
Call  405.607.0349

Web Design in Texas
Call  817.283.3324