Categories:

Your search for 'wallpapers' returned 3 results:

Merging Photos for your Wallpapers and Web Themes

Posted on May 23, 2011 by Jennifer Pointer

  Merged Photos 2 Merged photos 3

 Click on the images above to be taken to the source of each.

 

So, maybe you've been seeing some great "merged" or "layered" or "textured" photos on the web, and would love to have that look for the graphics on your web page or blog.  Did you know it's easy and fun to do?

 

This can be done in photoshop, or Gimp (which is the "free" equivalent of photoshop, and is what I use).   First you start with your main photo, and open it in your photo editor.  Let's use this one.

 

Merged Photos 4

 

Then, you click on "Layers" and "create a new layer."

 

Then, you'll add your second photo.  You can either click and drag one of the pre-loaded textures, patterns, gradients, or pallets, or you can use a photo you already have, or you can get one of about a gazillion free textures from places like Deviant Art or Flickr from the web (as always, be careful about downloading files from unkown sources).  You can click and drag from just about any window directly onto your newly created layer.  I'm ujsing a pattern that is alread in Gimp, called "Pine?" (yes, it has a question mark in the title), which I have desaturated, and lightened to look like this:

 


 

 Finally, with both layers visible, I used the "opacity" slider, to select how much of the original image and how much of the layer I wanted to show, and ended up with this:

 

 

And Voila!  It looks like we've printed the WebRev logo on wooden plaque.  Not bad.  I wonder if I should send this to Tim Short?  ;-)

 

Here's a video by Malgalin, with more details on exactly how to use textures in Gimp.

 

 


 

Jennifer Pointer

 

Jennifer Pointer (e-mail) is in Tulsa, OK. She promotes a simple, a low-tech approach to effective online profile management, search engine optimization and social networking. 
 

 

Share and Enjoy :
FacebookTwitterLinkedIndel.icio.usDiggReddit

Three Quick, Easy (and Free!) Ways to Hand-Tint Photos for your Wallpapers and Web Themes

Posted on April 18, 2011 by Jennifer Pointer

yellow 

Hand-tinted photography has been popular almost as long as has photography itself.  It started back in the day when photos were all monochrome.  Then, it became a way to create a nostalgic look (Kim Anderson's art has always been one of my favorites), and now that it can be done digitally, recoloring can be used either for the same purpose or to just give images a creative look.

 

We've talked previously about how creating wallpapers can be a great way to promote your business online and in the mobile market.  You may also find yourself wanting to update the look and feel of the photos used for your website theme or blog wallpaper/background.  Here are three quick, easy (and free!) ways to digitally manipulate your photos, and give them that "hand-tinted" look.

 

Smart Recolor in Photobucket

 

The look of the "after" photos in the above series of snow-covered forsythia blooms and the below series of a half-mast flag were tinted using Photobucket's "recoloring" tool (sign in, upload then "edit" your photo, go to the "geek" tab, and select "smart recoloring."  There's even a video of how to do it.  Basically, you select the colors you want to keep, and those you want to change, and the software does the rest.  For these, I kept the color of the flowers and the flag that I wanted to highlight, and changed the tint of everything else to a light gray.

 

flag

 

Unsaturate, then Copy/Paste

 

This can be done in any software program that allows you to adjust the color saturation of a photo, then select copy/paste parts of the original photo in color to the new, unsaturated photo.  Just save the first photo on your hard drive as-is, then unsaturate it and "save as" under a new name to create a new photo.  Then, carefully select, copy and paste from the old photo to the new one, or vice-versa.  That was the technique used on this series of photos taken by a Coca-Cola fan on the Japan Dream Kenjin sim on Second Life.

 

 

 

Colorize in Gimp

 

Gimp is a free download available online that has a lot of the most common features of Adobe Photoshop (which is pretty expensive).  The "after" photo (of the Second Life artists charity wall on Malandi for the victims of the recent earthquakes and tsunamis in Japan) below was used by uploading the first photo into Gimp, unsaturating the color then "selecting" a spherical shape, and "colorizing" it to red.  The resulting affect is a stylized tribute to Japan's flag.

 

Japan

 

Also see: Cool ways to help the people of Japan, and our collection of posts on "photos" here on WebRev.

 


 

Jennifer Pointer

 

Jennifer Pointer (e-mail) is in Tulsa, OK. She promotes a simple, a low-tech approach to effective online profile management, search engine optimization and social networking. 
 

 

Share and Enjoy :
FacebookTwitterLinkedIndel.icio.usDiggReddit

How to Create Wallpapers

Posted on March 7, 2011 by Jennifer Pointer

 

Sunset for iPhone

 

The above is for iPhone (Alternate Version for Desktop and for Android)

 

(UPDATED 04/17/11)

 

One way to drive traffic to your blog, or to keep your name or brand in front of your clients and potential customers on a daily basis is to offer free wallpapers.  I've provided an example above of a sunset over the Talimena Drive in Southeastern Oklahoma last Fall.  I could have also found a creative way to include my name or company name on the wallpaper, such as by using a watermark or non-obtrusive signature in one corner.

 

It is important to remember in creating wallpapers that these are the BACKGROUNDS for people's computer desktops or mobile devices, and that they need to be able to easily find their icons on top of the photo.  It's a good idea to keep text to a minimum, and to use patterns that are not too busy, and colors that will contrast with typical icons.  Try them out on your own desktop to get an idea if they'll work or not.

 

Once you've selected a photo or artwork you want to offer as a wallpaper, you'll need to modify the image to fit standard wallpaper sizes, as follows:

 

For computer or laptop desktops: 1024x768

For Widescreen: 1920x1080

For Androids: 640x480

For iPhones: 320x480

 

The exact sizes are not as important to as the dimensions, because most programs will automatically re-size the photos, but you might not want your customers to have to "crop" the photos to fit their screens. Most desktops and androids require photos to be 3/4ths as tall as they are wide, and most iPhones require photos to be 2/3rds as wide as they are tall. The ratio on widescreens is .5625.

 

I've found the easist way to resize the images to use my (free) Microsoft office picture manager.  I crop to the above dimensions, then resize as needed.  Try it - it's easy and fun!

 


 

Jennifer Pointer

 

Jennifer Pointer is in Tulsa, OK. She promotes a simple, a low-tech approach to effective online profile management, search engine optimization and social networking. 
 

Share and Enjoy :
FacebookTwitterLinkedIndel.icio.usDiggReddit

Want to work with us?
Get in touch

817.283.3324 Facebook LinkedIn Twitter